Fooling Around

Red Pirhana #1

Fooling around is good. Lately, I have been fooling around with crayons. After all, it is claimed by none other than Mr. Picasso that the more childlike you are, the better the work. Full disclosure is that the crayons are oil pastels and they are soluble in turpentine including the odorless variety. I am not sure what other advantages oil pastels offer but they sure are fun to work. You get a piece of paper treated to accept oil and just go at it. The fish that I have got going here is based on a posterized photo that appeared once in the New York Times. I wish that I had kept the salutation, if there was one. I believe that it was an illustration in the Review section of the Sunday paper. No, I did not copy it. Rather, I stole the idea of it, making it mine and now mine alone. The original was not pink and it looked quite different, sort of like an x-ray of the fish. It shape was different too. What’s the difference between copying and stealing? Amateurs slavishly copy; they don’t take an idea, rework it so that it becomes their own. It has been done since the first scratching on cave walls. Does that make it right? Of course. Art is after all an ongoing visual conversation in which ideas are swapped back and forth. The fish is done in a variety of oil pastel brands including Sennelier and Sakura on 16 x 20 inch 136 lb. Canson Canva-Paper.

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About mmgilbert

I have been drawing and painting all my life. Now part of the “New Symbolist” movement which encompasses both Goth, fantasy and tattoo art as well as the century-old work of Odilon Redon, I focus on archetypal and mythic imagery to evoke emotional themes and to reference darker fantasies. I have an abiding interest in figurative drawing, working on paper and exploring new ways to handle traditional materials. I studied with Edward Millman, a WPA muralist; at Purchase College; and at the Art Students League in New York.
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