Nude With Pillows Properly Placed

Nude with pillows #02

Nudes always get a reaction, one way or another. The most vociferous come from those who find them offensive or politically incorrect. That’s usually the case when a female figure is involved. From what I gather, the complaints come from those who seem to think that nudes are erotic and maybe even pornographic or exploitive; done by perverted male artists out for a cheap thrill. It turns out that most nudes that I recall are female and done by men. But, there are some notable exceptions. Michelangelo Buonarroti’s “David” and his “Pieta” both feature male forms that are short on clothing. More recently, there are Jenny Saville’s lushly painterly female and male nudes and Lucian Freud’s explicit male nudes. And, never mind Francis Bacon. Whatever you might think of all this work, the human form has depicted since people began making artwork. Life drawing and human anatomy are core to the curriculum of any half-decent art school. It teaches what we look like and what we should look at and, as such, is as important to art training as anatomy is to the medical profession. But, we still get folks who complain about depictions of naked ladies and the dirty-minded (male) art students who make them, never mind that about half of all art students, dirty-minded are not, are women themselves and every good life class will include both naked men and naked women (almost never together). So, just to make those who are concerned about propriety either nuts, offended or both, this drawing is called “Nude with Pillows Properly Placed.” It is 19 inches high by 24 across and done in charcoal, compressed charcoal and black chalk on 60 pound, Strathmore charcoal paper with a laid-paper texture.

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About mmgilbert

I have been drawing and painting all my life. Now part of the “New Symbolist” movement which encompasses both Goth, fantasy and tattoo art as well as the century-old work of Odilon Redon, I focus on archetypal and mythic imagery to evoke emotional themes and to reference darker fantasies. I have an abiding interest in figurative drawing, working on paper and exploring new ways to handle traditional materials. I studied with Edward Millman, a WPA muralist; at Purchase College; and at the Art Students League in New York.
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