Do the work: a new collage

Fascia Collage II

In early June, I posted a collage of four drawings from a series that I started when, in the midst of setting up a new studio, I caught in mid-air two sticks of compressed charcoal that were falling off a shelf. Back then, I said that I would continue this series until the pad I was using was filled up or I ran out of steam. The pad held 100 sheets and when I started, there were 44 blank pages left. The pad is now full. I did one or two drawings every day that I was in the studio, in large measure as a way to add variety to the work-flow or as a nice way to start the day. Each drawing is 11 x 14 on Strathmore 60 lb. sketch paper.
This new collage includes four drawings from among the last of the 44 that I made. They are chosen arbitrarily. Any of them may be better or worse than any of the others in the series. As I moved along, I sometimes added black Conté, sometimes sanguine Conté. Are these four or any of the 44 drawings any good? That’s your call. You might like all of them. You might like none of them. You might like one or two and hate some others.
What’s the point here? The point is that the way you make art, good or bad, is to do the work. Do it every day you show up for work. Start something; see what happens. And, then, do another one and, then, another. Don’t wait for inspiration. It is never around anyway. Don’t have a creative process other than showing up and getting started. Don’t intellectualize. That’s all a waste of time. Just do the work and every now and then, despite yourself, you might make magic.

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About mmgilbert

I have been drawing and painting all my life. Now part of the “New Symbolist” movement which encompasses both Goth, fantasy and tattoo art as well as the century-old work of Odilon Redon, I focus on archetypal and mythic imagery to evoke emotional themes and to reference darker fantasies. I have an abiding interest in figurative drawing, working on paper and exploring new ways to handle traditional materials. I studied with Edward Millman, a WPA muralist; at Purchase College; and at the Art Students League in New York.
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