Victualler 2004

I get emails from time-to-time asking whether my work – either the original or a print – is for sale and if so, how much? The work above is a case in point. After explaining that “Of course it is” and that the price is “very reasonable,” I like to point out buying art is one of the best investments you can make, provided that you buy what you like and not for investment purposes. The best example may be the Vogels. Herb and Dorothy Vogel were not wealthy people. He worked sorting mail for the Post Office. She was a librarian for the City of New York at the Brooklyn Library. Despite their limited resources they were able to amass an important collection, amounting to thousands of works, mostly post-modern conceptual and minimalist, which they kept in their one bedroom, rent controlled, Manhattan apartment. To buy the work, they lived on Dorothy’s salary and used Herb’s Post Office pittance to buy art. They were able to do it because they bought art because they loved it and because had the good fortune to befriend contemporary artists and, so, were able to buy work at more or less reasonable prices, sometime paying in installments. Over time, their collection became well-known to art museum professionals and when the Vogel’s apartment became totally stuffed, curators made them a deal they couldn’t refuse. 2,000 of the works in their little one-bedroom flat went directly from their small apartment (or, more accurately, from under their bed) to the National Gallery in Washington. They were paid for their holdings and apparently took these funds to amass another 2,000 or so works (which again ended up at the National Gallery.) Not to seem self-serving but the above piece, like everything else I and most professionals make, is for sale. It is a pen and ink on rough drawing paper, available as the original and as a print. What did you think; I did this for my health?

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About mmgilbert

I have been drawing and painting all my life. Now part of the “New Symbolist” movement which encompasses both Goth, fantasy and tattoo art as well as the century-old work of Odilon Redon, I focus on archetypal and mythic imagery to evoke emotional themes and to reference darker fantasies. I have an abiding interest in figurative drawing, working on paper and exploring new ways to handle traditional materials. I studied with Edward Millman, a WPA muralist; at Purchase College; and at the Art Students League in New York.
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